Call for Abstract

4th World Congress on Breast Cancer, will be organized around the theme “To Expose the Advances in Breast Cancer Research”

Breast Cancer Summit 2017 is comprised of keynote and speakers sessions on latest cutting edge research designed to offer comprehensive global discussions that address current issues in Breast Cancer Summit 2017

Submit your abstract to any of the mentioned tracks.

Register now for the conference by choosing an appropriate package suitable to you.

At least one in nine women develops breast cancer at some stage in their life. About 48,000 cases occur in the United Kingdom every year. Mostly develops in women over the age of 50 but younger women are also sometimes affected. Breast cancer can also develop in men, but this is rare. Breast cancer develops from a cancerous cell which develops in the lining of a mammary duct or a lobule in one of the breasts. It follows the classic progression though it often becomes systemic or widespread in the early onset of the disease. During this period, the cancer may metastasize, or spread through lymphatic’s or blood stream to areas elsewhere in the body. If breast cancer spreads to vital organs of the body, its presence will compromise the function of those organs. Fatal death is the result of extreme case of vital organ function.

  • Track 1-1Breast cancer knowledge and Characteristics
  • Track 1-2Luminal A and B Breast cancer
  • Track 1-3Metastatic Breast Cancer
  • Track 1-4Signs, symptoms & Stages of Breast Cancer
  • Track 1-5Biological therapy (Herceptin)
  • Track 1-6Myths and Truths in Breast Cancer
  • Track 1-7Depression

Breast cancer can begin in different areas of the breast — the ducts, the lobules, or in some cases, the tissue in between. In this section, you can learn about the different types of breast cancer, including non-invasive, invasive, recurrent, and metastatic breast cancers. 

  • Track 2-1IDC Type: Mucinous Carcinoma of the Breast
  • Track 2-2ILC — Invasive Lobular Carcinoma
  • Track 2-3Inflammatory Breast Cancer
  • Track 2-4DCIS — Ductal Carcinoma In Situ
  • Track 2-5IDC Type: Tubular Carcinoma of the Breast
  • Track 2-6IDC Type: Cribriform Carcinoma of the Breast
  • Track 2-7IDC Type: Medullary Carcinoma of the Breast
  • Track 2-8IDC Type: Papillary Carcinoma of the Breast
  • Track 2-9Phyllodes Tumours of the Breast

Experts are not definitively sure what causes breast cancer. It is hard to say why one person develops the disease while another does not. We know that some risk factors can impact on a woman's likelihood of developing breast cancer. These are: The older a woman gets, the higher is her risk of developing breast cancer; age is a risk factor. Over 80% of all female breast cancers occur among women aged 50+ years (after the menopause). Women who carry the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have a considerably higher risk of developing breast and/or ovarian cancer. These genes can be inherited. The Mayo Clinic says that if a woman wants to drink, she should not exceed one alcoholic beverage per day Undergoing X-rays and CT scans may raise a woman's risk of developing breast cancer slightly. Scientists at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Centre found that women who had been treated with radiation to the chest for a childhood cancer have a higher risk of developing breast cancer both forms, combined and oestrogen only HRT therapies may increase a woman's risk of developing breast cancer slightly. Combined HRT causes a higher risk. French researchers found that women who worked at night prior to a first pregnancy had a higher risk of eventually developing breast cancer.

  • Track 3-1A history of breast cancer
  • Track 3-2HRT(Hormone Replace therapy)
  • Track 3-3Radiation Exposure
  • Track 3-4Alcohol consumption
  • Track 3-5Height
  • Track 3-6Dense breast tissue
  • Track 3-7Having had certain types of breast lumps
  • Track 3-8Genetics
  • Track 3-9Getting older
  • Track 3-10Obesity
  • Track 3-11Estrogen exposure
  • Track 3-12Certain jobs

The epidemiology of Breast cancer is the study of the factors affecting cancer, as a way to infer possible trends and causes.  Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women, with approximately 182,000 women diagnosed with breast cancer annually in the United States, accounting for approximately 26% of all incident cancers among women. Each year, 40,000 women die of breast cancer, making it the second-leading cause of cancer deaths among American women after lung cancer. The lifetime risk of dying of breast cancer is approximately 3.4%. Breast cancer comprises 22.9% of invasive cancers in women and 16% of all female cancers. In 2008, breast cancer caused 458,503 deaths worldwide, 13.7% of cancer deaths in women and 6.0% of all cancer deaths for men and women together. The number of cases worldwide has significantly increased since the 1970s, a phenomenon partly attributed to the modern lifestyles.

  • Track 4-1Etiology
  • Track 4-2Screening Biomonitoring
  • Track 4-3Forensic Epidemiology
  • Track 4-4Preventive Healthcare
  • Track 4-5Endogenous Hormones
  • Track 4-6Hormonal Therapy for the Menopause
  • Track 5-1Mammography
  • Track 5-2Molecular Diagnosis
  • Track 5-32d combined with 3d mammogram
  • Track 5-4Ultrasound
  • Track 5-5Biopsy
  • Track 5-6MRI
  • Track 6-1Surgery
  • Track 6-2Radiation Therapy
  • Track 6-3Chemotherapy
  • Track 6-4Hormone Therapy
  • Track 6-5Biological Treatment(targeted therapy)
  • Track 7-1Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy
  • Track 7-2Adjuvant Chemotherapy
  • Track 7-3Dose-dense Chemotherapy
  • Track 7-4Combinational Chemotherapy
  • Track 7-5Breast Cancer in Young Women and in Pregnancy
  • Track 7-6HER-2 Positive Breast Cancer
  • Track 7-7Breast cancer, Psychosis and Schizophrenia
  • Track 8-1Breast-Sparing Surgery
  • Track 8-2Breast-conserving surgery or mastectomy
  • Track 8-3Lymph node surgery
  • Track 8-4Segmental mastectomy
  • Track 8-5Breast Reconstruction Surgery
  • Track 8-6Tissue Flap surgery
  • Track 9-1Routine cancer genotyping
  • Track 9-2Partial breast irradiation
  • Track 9-3Proton beam radiation
  • Track 9-4Limiting Lymphedema
  • Track 9-5Surgical Advances
  • Track 9-6Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
  • Track 9-7Anti- angiogenesis, Genetic risk and genetic testing (BRCA etc.)
  • Track 10-1Phases of Trails
  • Track 10-2Cohort and Case Studies
  • Track 10-3Randomisation
  • Track 10-4Screening and Prevention trials
  • Track 10-5Pilot Studies and Feasibility Studies
  • Track 11-1Physical Exercise
  • Track 11-2Diet
  • Track 11-3Post-menopausal Therapy
  • Track 11-4Women at High risk of Breast Cancer
  • Track 11-5Breast cancer screening
  • Track 11-6Breast Feeding
  • Track 11-7Body Weight
  • Track 12-1Breast Cancer Treatment during Pregnancy
  • Track 12-2Side Effects
  • Track 12-3Medication
  • Track 13-1Pink Ribbon
  • Track 13-2Breast Cancer Culture
  • Track 13-3Emphasis
  • Track 14-1Reproductive and Sexual Health
  • Track 14-2Non-Reproductive Health
  • Track 14-3Cardiovascular Disease
  • Track 14-4Bone Health
  • Track 14-5Dementia
  • Track 15-1Mood Disorders
  • Track 15-2Anxiety Disorders
  • Track 15-3Eating disorders in women: Current Issues and Debates
  • Track 15-4Stress
  • Track 16-1Pregnancy - Health Tools
  • Track 16-2Drugs During Pregnancy and Lactation
  • Track 16-3High-Risk Pregnancy: Management Options
  • Track 16-4Sexual activities during Pregnancy
  • Track 16-5Pregnancy - Prenatal Visits and Tests
  • Track 16-6Pregnancy - Health Concerns
  • Track 16-7Pre-Pregnancy Weight Loss
  • Track 16-8Pregnancy - Health and Nutrition
  • Track 16-9Pregnancy - Planning for Labour
  • Track 17-1Physical and Psychological Symptoms
  • Track 17-2Menopause: Treatments and Therapies
  • Track 17-3Menopause and lateral Complications
  • Track 17-4Management Strategies
  • Track 17-5Staying Healthy After Menopause
  • Track 17-6Societal and Cultural Disparities